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What to Do if Your A-Level Results Aren't What You Expected


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A-Level results day can be a nerve-wracking experience, even if you've been confident in your studies. If you open your results envelope and find that your grades aren't what you were hoping for, it's important to remember that you're not alone. Many students don't get the grades they want, and there are still plenty of options available to you.


Here are some things you can do if your A-Level results aren't what you expected:


Take some time to process your A-Level results


It's normal to feel disappointed or even upset if your results aren't what you were hoping for. Give yourself some time to come to terms with your results before making any decisions about your next steps.

  • Be patient with yourself. It takes time to process disappointment. Don't expect to feel better overnight.

  • Don't compare yourself to others. Everyone is different and has their own unique path to follow.

  • Focus on the positive. Even if your results aren't what you were hoping for, there are still things to be positive about. For example, you may have worked hard and achieved a lot in your studies.

  • Remember that you're not alone. Many students experience disappointment when they receive their A-Level results. It's important to know that you're not alone and that there are people who can help you through this.


Talk to your parents, teachers, or a careers advisor


They can offer you support and advice on what to do next. You could set up a meeting with them in person as it will give you a chance to talk to them in private and really get their advice. Or you could send them an email or message if you’re not comfortable talking to them in person.


Here are some questions you can ask your parents, teachers, or a careers advisor:

  • What do you think about my results?

  • What are my options now?

  • How can I improve my chances of getting into university?

  • What are some other career paths I could explore?

  • How can I get support through this difficult time?

It's important to remember that your parents, teachers, and careers advisor are there to help you. They want to see you succeed, and they will be happy to offer you any support you need.


Here are some additional tips for talking to your parents, teachers, or a careers advisor:

  • Be honest with them about how you're feeling. They can't help you if they don't know what's going on.

  • Be open to their advice. They may have some helpful insights that you haven't thought of.

  • Don't be afraid to ask for help. They are there to support you, so don't hesitate to ask for help if you need it.


Consider your options


There are a number of different paths you can take if your A-Level results aren't what you expected. These include:

  • Using Clearing to find a university place. Clearing is a system that allows you to apply for a university place at the last minute, if you don't get your firm or insurance offers. There are still many universities with places available in Clearing, so don't give up hope!

  • Taking a gap year. A gap year can be a great way to travel, gain work experience, or volunteer. It can also give you some time to think about what you want to do next.

  • Resitting your A-Levels. If you're still determined to study the course you originally wanted to do, you can resit your A-Levels the following year. This will give you another chance to improve your grades.

  • Looking at different course options. If you're not sure what you want to do next, you could consider looking at different course options. There are many different courses available at university, so there's sure to be something that's a good fit for you.

Different course options


If you're considering looking at different course options, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • What are your interests and skills? What do you enjoy learning about? What are you good at?

  • What are your career goals? What do you want to do after university?

  • What are the entry requirements for the courses you're interested in? Make sure you have the necessary grades and qualifications.

  • What is the cost of the course? Consider the tuition fees, living expenses, and other costs involved.

  • What is the reputation of the university? Do some research to make sure the university is accredited and has a good reputation.

Here are some specific course options you could consider:

  • Foundation courses: Foundation courses are designed to help students who didn't get the grades they needed for their chosen university course. They typically last one year and cover the essential skills and knowledge needed for a particular subject.

  • Pre-degree courses: Pre-degree courses are similar to foundation courses, but they are more specific to a particular university or course. They can be a good option if you are interested in studying at a particular university, but you didn't get the grades you needed for their direct entry course.

  • Vocational courses: Vocational courses are designed to give you the skills and knowledge you need for a specific job or career. They can be a good option if you are not sure what you want to do after university, or if you want to gain some practical experience before going on to further study.

  • Apprenticeships: Apprenticeships are a great way to combine on-the-job training with academic study. They can be a good option if you want to learn a trade or technical skill, or if you want to gain work experience in a particular industry.

  • International study: If you are interested in studying abroad, there are many opportunities available to you. You could consider applying to a university in another country, or you could take a gap year to travel and study.

No matter what course you choose, it's important to do your research and make sure it's a good fit for you. There are many different options available, so there's sure to be something that's right for you.


Conclusion


If your A-Level results aren't what you were hoping for, don't give up. There are still plenty of options available to you. Take some time to process your results, talk to your parents, teachers, or a careers advisor, and consider your options. Remember, your A-Level results aren't the end of the world. With hard work and determination, you can still achieve your dreams.


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